• Katsushika, Hokusai, 1760-1849, artist, [between 1804 and 1818] 1 print : woodcut, color ; 23.2 x 17.2 cm.


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  • Katsushika, Hokusai, 1760-1849, artist, [between 1804 and 1818] 1 print : woodcut, color ; 23.2 x 17.2 cm.
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Think Like a Detective

Author: Jodi Sabra

 

Happy New Year.

I came back to school after a week in Florida, and I have that just-thrown-back-in-the-deep-end readjustment that most middle school teachers are feeling right now.  It’s like, Welcome back, and Wait, where did we leave off?  It’s a perfect time to introduce murder mysteries and How to think like a detective.

I began by introducing my students to W5H: Who, What , Where, When, Why, How?  We’re learning to think and read and write like detectives.  We’re figuring out a murder and unpacking the crime scene.  We’re determining which characters are reliable and which are suspect.

My kids just discovered that the trunk they’ve been sitting on during read-aloud time is full of costumes.  (Funny, they never asked!) And we’re reading Murder on the Orient Express.  The students have figured out how to rearrange the room to match the setting of the novel, and things need to be returned to normal for the next class.  Anyhow, there are several resources on the LOC site that we will incorporate into our classroom stage set.

Here are a few LOC items to enhance their sense of wonder and understanding about: the 1930’s and 40’s; the geography and cartography of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Morocco, Italy, France, England from that time; detective’s tools then and now; determining facts & detecting lies; the fashion and mindset of ladies and gentlemen who traveled internationally; train travel, and The Simplon Orient Express.

 Check out these amazing travel posters that evoke the romance of international travel:

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/coll/travel-posters.html

 A glimpse at some NYC police and detectives in the early 1900’s...it might be interesting to compare how crimes are solved today versus in the early part of the 20th century:

https://www.loc.gov/item/2006677374/

A fascinating history of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping which is loosely referenced in Murder on the Orient ExpressFBI File on the Lindbergh Kidnapping

Images of Simplon Pass:

https://www.loc.gov/item/2001703319/

If I project these images on the White Board while they’re setting up the scene, then prompt them to look at the image through their ‘detective’s lenses’, it gives them another opportunity to practice "thinking like detectives." The LOC Graphic Organizer  is a perfect tool for encouraging students to observe closely, pose questions and uncover facts.

It’s hard to take things too seriously while my students are dressed in my mother’s housecoat and my great uncle’s hats, so interjecting images from the Library of Congress brings a bit of ‘real life’ into our discovery time.  If you’ve studied murder mysteries, leave a little message and share any links/books/resources you used for your unit.  Have a great 2018!

    • Early 1900s Detectives
    • Simpleton Pass
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